Oui! Non!

I love a good graphic tee, but have issues with most of them. I’m conflicted – anything that makes strange weirdos stare at my chest, naturally makes me super uncomfortable. So I’m very selective about the graphic tees I wear as to avoid said awkwardness. This cute and simple one came across my path while browsing for new Made in USA brands on Shopbop. I think the front is good, the back is even better!

Item From Made in… BUY
Clayton top Shopbop.com USA HERE
vintage Levi’s 517 thrifted USA HERE
Fjallraven backpack Shopbop.com Vietnam HERE
vintage RayBan wayfarer glasses thrifted USA
vintage Swatch watch flea market Switzerland
Loeffler Randall flats Shopbop.com Brazil

Thrift Eye, how to wear vintage levis, San Francisco style, style blogger

Thrift Eye, how to wear vintage levis, San Francisco style, style blogger

Thrift Eye, how to wear vintage levis, San Francisco style, style blogger

Thrift Eye, how to wear vintage levis, San Francisco style, style blogger

Spotlight on: Reformation

You’ll be able to follow all of these spotlight posts here, but also keep up with my Made in the USA series here.

I found out about Reformation in the oddest way possible – at the thrift store!

What I thought was a typical weekend for me at the thrift store, going from rack to rack like I normally do, turned out not as typical. I noticed tons of brand new dresses from this brand Reformation! All made in the USA! I called up a very fashionable friend of mine who works in the industry (but has since moved out of San Francisco) and she let me know they had just had a sample sale in SF. So it looks like the loot I had come across were sample sale leftovers. I scooped up armloads of these items to try on. Sadly, the sample sale sizes were way too tiny for me, other pieces were true samples (aka garments that were not finished.) None of it came home with me, but petite industry friend was able to go back later and get lots of things for herself! And the more that I looked into the brand, the better I liked them for their sustainability endeavors.

“Created in 2009 by Yael Aflalo, we design and manufacture the majority of our limited-edition collections in our factory headquarters in downtown Los Angeles. All other garments are produced by responsible manufacturing partners here in the U.S. or abroad using sustainable methods and materials. We source sustainable fabrics and vintage garments while incorporating better practices throughout our supply chain to make beautiful styles at a fraction of the environmental impact of conventional fashion. It is our mission to lead and inspire a sustainable way to be fashionable.”

The brand is aiming to make transparency and sustainability of buying, caring for, and reusing fabrics a larger part of the fashion conversation (similar to how Everlane does.) I like their washing tips on their website! *especially since I hate laundry*
1. Only wash when needed
2. When you can, skip the dryer
3. Wash cold
4. Spot clean if you can, instead of washing the whole thing
5. Freeze your denim instead of washing

Oh yeah, their clothes are pretty darn cute too

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling

Reformation, reformation clothing brand, made in the USA, sustainable fashion, upcycling
All photos from thereformation.com

Shopping responsibly and conciously links

Links posts are a dedicated space here for a roundup of links (that don’t fall into my normal post categories) that are sharing information about Made in USA, and as the title mentions, shopping responsibly and consciously.

There is no title to this link, other than I recently stopped by what was my old Made in USA favorite and found an unannounced change. See the sign above, a picture I took years ago. This time I when I went in, I noticed the signs and labels had chanaged to Made in China!!

See how their Our Story section now states

We produce most of our line in San Francisco & Los Angeles, where some of the best knits in the world are made. For our more technical styles, we manufacture overseas in the same fair and ethical garment factories that we would use in the states. The relationships that we build with our sewers are important to us, and we are confident that our product and brand are in good hands.

I’d be lying if I didn’t say I was a little disappointed. But a lot of brands have been moving this way.

Big Words, Little Actions

Susie broaches the subject of fashion and sustainability, and how it’s such a difficult subject – but that sustainability should not be a small slice of the conversation, it should just be the norm.

20 PEOPLE THAT ACCIDENTALLY DRESSED LIKE THEIR SURROUNDINGS

When fashion is influenced by anything and everything, follies like this happen more often! It’s pretty hilarious.

Is Your Product Truly American-Made? How Imports, Suppliers and More Play Into the Coveted Made in USA Claim

Now that consumers are driving the supply chains with more understanding of promotion and products, they’re finally questioning the origins of their products more. Can a company really claim their products were made in the USA when all the pieces came from another country? Some lawsuits are challenging that!

‘Made in USA’ jeans case settles

Case in point – man sues AG jeans for Made in USA label but finds out most of the pieces but the denim are made in other countries, feels manipulated for paying more for a quality item, class action lawsuit follows. Now you too may qualify for a free pair of AG jeans if you are part of the suit!

Caveat emptor – Buzzfeed investigates “Made in China”

Have any of you been following these Buzzfeed stories about angry buyers who received their merchandise from Chinese wholesale retailers? It’s quite fascinating. It is the ultimate buyer beware moment we dread while shopping online. I think it’s best to say that if it’s too good to be true, it probably is. Always try to do your research on the retailer before buying anything online.

I wasn’t going to write about this topic – except the week the original Buzzfeed article came out, I was emailed by one of the retailers asking me to run ads for them. They must have missed the whole thing about me being very pro-Made in the USA. I just didn’t respond to them – but I know that other bloggers run ads for these companies and often take free clothes from them.

The original article is about how Facebook heavily advertises and misleads users towards these sketchy online retailers.

Buzzfeed investigates
picture from Facebook group

The people then began to use Facebook itself as a tool to warn other potential buyers – creating forums where people could share their woes and warnings. They were also using the ability to contact Facebook heads via Facebook itself, to shame them for accepting ad money from these retailers. Facebook had no choice but to respond – it looks as if action still hasn’t been taken though.

I found it even more interesting that Buzzfeed followed up for us all by ordering a spread of merchandise from the accused sellers and creating a whole other post about it. Most of the items were not as described, just as the people on Facebook had shown. Items tend to not be of the fabric described and sizing was off.

Buzzfeed
Lauren Zaser / Jenny Chang / BuzzFeed

A few of the things were wearable, but not of great quality and just not what the original picture presented. There was no original item, the retailers are stealing pictures from blogs and Instagram to sell items they do not carry in the first place. I haven’t heard much from the story recently – but I’m definitely following these types of stories as they progress.

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