Remix: Swedish Hasbeens

I wish sandal weather was here to stay more often – I own two pairs of sandals now since living in SF. I rarely wear them in the city, but love taking them on vacation (and wearing them on rare sunny days!). They’re not in the best condition any more since having to trudge across a river in them (long story) – I’m hoping to eventually replace them, especially in a fun color! But right now, they’ll do :) Get yours HERE

Per usual with these Remix posts, click on the image to see the original post!

Striped casual here, helping my mom look for her Mother of the Bride dress for my sisters wedding (in the end, she had one custom made instead!)
Thrift Eye, swedish hasbeens, style blogger

At the shore in double denim
Thrift Eye

I don’t wear sandals to work anymore (feet easily get run over at the library by book trucks), but my old library job that was in the office allowed me to wear them when I wanted, like this!
Thrift Eye

Yikes, I don’t think I’d wear this outfit or anything like it again.
Thrift Eye

Sadly, the shoes are the only part of this outfit I still have. After I lost weight, all of this had to go! I’d wear it again if I could…
Thrift Eye

The funny thing about these shoes (besides running small) is that they’re literally the most uncomfortable shoe ever the first time wearing them – they feel exactly what you would imagine walking with a piece of wood tied to your foot feels like. But then your foot learns to adjust to the curve carved in (or maybe the curve adjusts to you?)

Remix: American Apparel

I don’t usually follow up my Spotlight posts with a Remix – but considering the vast amount of American Apparel has dotted my wardrobe over the course of my blogging years, it was a no brainer. It has always been a basics brand I’ve supported! But whilst living in Las Vegas (can you believe it’s already been almost five years since I moved away? I can’t!) I had lots of friends that worked for the brand, and as a student & someone starting their career, their price points always worked for me.

Let’s go down memory lane – some posts will be going back to the beginnings of the blog. You’ll see how much my style (and picture quality) has evolved! Funny enough, there is no way I can even show you in fact how much more American Apparel shows up here. These are just some of my favorites :)

Per usual with Remix posts, click on the image to see the original post!

I still really like my twist scarves, I have it in black now too!
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

American Apparel is known for versatile pieces – once upon a time, I wore this as a dress! It’s now strictly worn as a skirt!
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

The jumpsuit is now gone (I didn’t want to admit it was too short for my torso length), but I had fun wearing it anyway.
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

I still love my Le Sac dress, even though I rarely get to wear it in SF. It’s the easiest vacation dress because it takes up so little space in the suitcase!
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

I recently also got rid of this leotard - I loved it while I had it, but since you basically have to wear it braless – those days are behind me ;)
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

Once upon a time, I would have worn this as a dress too! (in Las Vegas, you get away with wearing really short stuff!). But used it as a top for my trip to Mexico. Eventually, this left my closet because it ripped!
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

I have no idea where this oversized grey top went! If I didn’t have another similar one by another brand, I’d buy it again.
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

Why was I so emo here?! I remember buying this because I thought I needed more pink in my wardrobe.
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

Holy cow this is short! I can’t believe I wore this to work!
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

Another one of the colorful basics tops! I’m pretty sure these aren’t my wardrobe anymore because I carelessly let them get stained :(
Thrift Eye, made in USA, wearing American Apparel, style blogger

There’s a few things in AA stores right now I wouldn’t mind getting – but sometimes their clothes are just way too short for me (when I have to be professional at work!) My first American Apparel piece was a triblend top that was given to me at a 2006 Las Vegas tradeshow for free when they were first branching out wholesale – I still have that top! It has turned into a very soft, almost vintage-like piece that I won’t be getting rid of any time soon.

Spotlight on: American Apparel

You’ll be able to follow all of these spotlight posts here, but also keep up with my Made in the USA series here.

I might be throwing myself into the sharks here – but as much as controversy loves to swarm around American Apparel like the sky is blue, there is no denying that they do a great good bringing jobs to the US and being so vocal about manufacturing here. In fact, because of their woes – I think it might be a good idea for the company to be sold off to a bigger one that could absorb the larger issues. Wouldn’t it be great if a large retailer like Target carried American Apparel in stores instead? That way a brand/company like Target could diversify their assets (I don’t think any of their Apparel is currently made in the US) and bring in a company with established brand recognition? Imagine the possibilities! But I’m dreaming over here of course.

Their About page states-

Our Garment Workers Are Paid Up To 50 Times More Than The Competition
A garment worker in Bangladesh earns an average of $600 a year. An experienced American Apparel garment worker can earn $30,000+ and receive benefits such as comprehensive health care. American Apparel garments are created by motivated and fairly-paid employees who don’t just have jobs – they have careers. Our culture recognizes outstanding performance and promotes from within. Most importantly, our workers have a voice and influence the direction of the company. At American Apparel we call it Sweatshop-Free, a term we coined in 2002.
Unlike Our Competitors, We Make Our Own Product
The American Apparel factory is the largest sewing facility in North America. We believe that integrating our manufacturing, distribution and creative processes keeps our company more efficient than those who rely on offshore or onshore sub-contracting. By leveraging art, design, and technology at our Downtown LA campus, we are able to pay garment workers fairly AND sell garments profitably so we can sustain our business and grow. Everyone benefits – customers, workers, and shareholders alike.
In spite of the former CEO troubles, troublesome and questionable ads, poorly managed stores sometimes even suspicions of sweatshoplike conditions in the US! – American Apparel is bringing Made in USA clothing back to the forefront of fashion and manufacturing. They’re making it commonplace, we’ve just gotten so used to seeing the labels with Made in ANOTHER COUNTRY. Being a large company gives them the same type issues other large companies face, they’re unfortunately not immune to it (but hey, so do places like Zara and H&M!). Absolutely things could be better. So here’s to hoping their management makes huge strides towards being a better overall company – they’re sitting on potential.

American Apparel

American Apparel

American Apparel

American Apparel

American Apparel

American Apparel

American Apparel

Spotlight on: Eva Franco

You’ll be able to follow all of these spotlight posts here, but also keep up with my Made in the USA series here.

One thing about Made in USA clothing is that because cotton is the most popular and widely available fabric to manufacture, most (but not all) items made are variations cotton basics. Some brands are defying that notion, and Eva Franco has been a buzz name I’ve been hearing more about in the fashion world over the last few years.

After graduating from New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology, Franco went to Paris, where she continued her education as a design assistant for Etienne Brunel.
But it was when she moved to Los Angeles that she began crafting clothes for herself. Fueled by positive remarks from passersby, she set up shop at a local flea market, where she was able to learn directly from customers about creating pieces that celebrate the female form.
Today the Eva Franco brand can be found in 800 stores domestically and internationally. All clothing is made in Los Angeles, where her company is based.

I’ll let the clothes speak for themselves – if you love dresses (*raises hand*) you’ll love Eva Franco’s designs!

Eva Franco, made in USA clothing, womens fashion

Eva Franco, made in USA clothing, womens fashion

Eva Franco, made in USA clothing, womens fashion

Eva Franco, made in USA clothing, womens fashion

Eva Franco, made in USA clothing, womens fashion

Eva Franco, made in USA clothing, womens fashion

Do you currently own any Eva Franco pieces? I can’t wait to save up one day and call one of these pretty dresses my own!

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