Shopping responsibly and consciously links

Links posts are a dedicated space here for a roundup of links (that don’t fall into my normal post categories) that are sharing information about Made in USA, and as the title mentions, shopping responsibly and consciously.

This is me trying on the satin jumpsuit I regret not buying at the thrift store AND then I remember it had stains and I feel better 🙂
Thrift Eye

Put Your Credit Card Away & Try These 7 “Shop Your Stash” Tricks Instead
The trick is to learn how to shop your own closet so you can curb your cravings and spend less.

THE END OF AN ERA
American Apparel was the original brand for the perfect basics from literally every category, and in every color imaginable… but it was never boring. Their basics were just the beginning. Their (at times) raunchy and (always) sexy ad campaigns made hipsters mainstream — and uncomfortably seductive as a new “real”, less skinny idea of the model emerged.

Is this why your Zara shopping habit drops off when you reach 30?
The company studied social engagement to assess how women feel about the Inditex-owned brand and found that engagement is at a high between ages 23 and 27. By the age of 33, engagement is rock bottom (around 1%).

Thrift Store Hauls
A subreddit for people to post all the stuff they find at Thrift Stores. Some are really random or strange, but some people share really awesome things they find!

Here are 5 (of many) reasons I no longer shop at Urban Outfitters. Hopefully you’ll join me.
People like to shop at places with cool stuff. And for that mildly obvious reason, Urban Outfitters’ popularity makes sense. But how many fans of Urban Outfitters would continue their patronage if they found that behind the scenes, the company was the stark opposite of cool?

Shopping responsibly and consciously links

Links posts are a dedicated space here for a roundup of links (that don’t fall into my normal post categories) that are sharing information about Made in USA, and as the title mentions, shopping responsibly and consciously.

Hello December! (and see you soon January!) It’s been a crazy long time, as I’ve been re-energizing my life offline to get reinspired and charging my batteries for 2017. I was drained…aren’t we all?! I’ve become disillusioned with people and things I see online – a wave of sameness, that I’m evaluating how I can be a different voice and continue to march to the beat of my own drum in spite of it all! Let’s jump right into all the links I’ve been saving to share with you all!

Thrift Eye

A picture of a vintage Geoffrey Beene sequined coat I came across at my last trip to the flea market. It was stunning to see in person (but not something I purchased for myself.) It was extremely similar in style to the sequined pieces in the Gucci 2016 Spring line! Again, a reminder that what goes around, comes around!

Kelly Wearstler’s 5 Tips for Flea Market Shopping

Since I love flea market shopping for finding inspiration, I thought I’d link to style guru, Kelly Wearstler’s market tips! Some are for furniture, but could be applied to anything!

100% Silk…

…feeling polyester. I came across this photo on Reddit and people were having a hoot about how misleading fashion can be!

The real cost of ASOS’s fast fashion

I don’t personally shop at ASOS because their style is a little too juvenile for my own taste. Similar to other stories about Amazon fulfillment warehouse horror stories, this investigation into ASOS warehouse practices is quite sad. We’ve changed our taste in fashion to be instant, and we want our online orders delivered immediately too – without realizing that it comes at the physical and mental health cost of many people!

MY INTIMATE STORY: WHY MADE IN THE USA IS IMPORTANT

I have been following the chronicles of Madalynne as she moves away from her day job at the Urban Outfitters realm into making her own line of lingerie that is carried in said stores! What a great business jump. The post is short and sophisticated in her sharing why Made in USA is important to her. I like her quote from another person “made in the USA is the next best thing to handmade.”

Unravelling the Myth of ‘Made in America’

The Business of Fashion goes far again, in researching the realities and truths of what it means to manufacture and shop Made in USA. I’ve learned myself to be realistic about what it means and what it could look like. I’m not naive to stating that it all needs to move back. I just believe in supporting companies that do. As I’ve explored here in past Links roundups, some people definitely pander to the phrase and exploit it to its full ability! I also found this statistic shocking “In the 1960s, more than 95 percent of apparel bought in the US was made in the US. But increased free trade with China, starting in the 1980s, pushed that number down significantly. By 1993, just over half of the garments sold here were made here. In 2015, 97 percent of clothes sold in the US were imported, not just from China, but also from other offshore manufacturing centres like Bangladesh, Vietnam, India and Indonesia”

Shopping responsibly and consciously links

Links posts are a dedicated space here for a roundup of links (that don’t fall into my normal post categories) that are sharing information about Made in USA, and as the title mentions, shopping responsibly and consciously.

I recently found this super-sweet gorgeous gown while thrifting – it reminded me of how much beautiful clothes is out there with nowhere to wear it to!
Thrift Eye

Get Your Money’s Worth

I loved this segment on This American Life about money and LL Bean wrestling with the consequences of its “no questions asked,” lifetime return policy! As someone who frequently sees LL Bean while thrifting, this kind of made me question a lot of things.

Sometimes Saks Fifth Avenue Is Cheaper Than The Outlet

It doesn’t take a genius to figure this out. This happens all the time with collaboration pieces too. You can always find the real thing even cheaper, used! So now, not only is it cheaper at the Main store – you’re also swindled by believing outlet store things were originally in the main stores. Most outlet stores manufacture clothing especially for the outlets!

FAST FASHION IS CREATING AN ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS

How many times do we have to repeat this news? “84 percent of unwanted clothes in the United States in 2012 went into either a landfill or an incinerator.” That’s just horribly insane figures!

Dear Everlane…

This open letter to Everlane is kind of bananas! Their reply back is just hilarious.

Shopping responsibly and consciously links

Links posts are a dedicated space here for a roundup of links (that don’t fall into my normal post categories) that are sharing information about Made in USA, and as the title mentions, shopping responsibly and consciously.
Thrift Eye

Before I post anything else, I can’t even find the right words to express my sadness and anger over all the shootings that have happened in the last few days AND months. Black lives matter. LGBTQ lives matter. Immigrant lives matter. And we can stand together to fight inequalities and injustices. Speak for the voiceless. We need to make this an ongoing conversation in all our lives.

AMERICANS DON’T CARE ABOUT “MADE IN THE USA”

“The Associated Press and market research firm GfK polled more than 1,000 Americans…and discovered that 71 percent said they would like to buy items made in the U.S. but high prices and limited availability prevent them from doing so.” The article is behind an ad to join the website, but the article is so short, you can just read it behind the ad. It says most people don’t want to pay the price for Made in USA!

Research Shows Majority of Consumers Want Made in USA Apparel

Wow it’s hard to hear one headline and then another. But good to hear that people still want this – I guess what we need to do is revolutionize the way we think of buying clothes. “Among those who say it’s important that the clothes they buy are made in the USA, 79 percent say it’s because they prefer to support the U.S. economy, 46 percent believe U.S.-made apparel is better quality, and 30 percent believe it’s environmentally-friendly, according to the Monitor data.”

American Apparel uses crowdsourcing to seek new product ideas

“The Los Angeles-based company, which recently announced that it might start outsourcing some manufacturing to another U.S. clothing maker, is asking vendors to submit proposals for U.S.-made goods that would retail for $100 or less.” Crowdsourcing is a little misleading, since the crowd being asked are other potential vendors. But an interesting idea nonetheless.

Shinola’s founder shows how contradictory the FTC’s “Made in the USA” regulations are

Sometimes I wonder what things would look like if regulators (like FTC) put the work they do into regulating Made in USA, into punishing American brands that have sweatshops overseas…This is an ongoing conversation about is an item technically Made in the USA when built with parts made elsewhere? Shinola was dragged into this by the Federal Trade Commission. The article explains more, but I like this Shinola statement, “Until a change in policy clarifies for the consumer what it truly means to be Made in the USA, Shinola will always strive to do as much as it can in America with the benefit of an American workforce.”

Made in America: 9 Brands That You’ll Be Surprised Are Still Manufacturing in the USA

Did you know Shinola manufactures in the USA? I didn’t until I read the article above. It’s awesome to find out information about more brands. Apartment Therapy shares some home goods brands that are USA made! I would recommend to read the comments too.

PS. The picture above is from my yearly visit to the West Coast Craft show, featuring West Coast artisans. I never got around to sharing the pictures…oops!